Swing with me, please?

Canon EOS 700D, f/5.6, 1/2 sec, ISO-6400

Statue of Rao Gopal Dev, Rewari

Rao Gopal Dev was a nineteenth-century revolutionary leader in Rewari, India, who had allied himself with his cousin, Rao Tula Ram, during the Indian Rebellion of 1857.
Now there is Rao Gopal Dev chowk is situated at Rewari, where Narnaul and Mahendergarh road are departed from the chowk and a statue of him have been built in his memory and inaugurated by the Haryana Chief Minister on 16 December 2008

SAMSUNG GT-I9100 f/2.7, 1/4000 sec, ISO-40

Aunt’s Desert

Aunt preparing desert, in village at Haryana, India. In Haryana, people pay respect to all elder ladies who are senior to your mother, by addressing them as ‘Tai’ (ताई). So the first name for this picture intuitively came as Tai Ki Kheer (ताई की खीर). But to get the meaning for universe, I had to pick title of universal language. Hence Aunt’s Desert it is.

Given the background now, Tai is cooking desert which is called Kheer (खीर) in a traditional brass vessel, flamed up on a bonfire, you can say its Tai’s bonfire recipes. Kheer is a South Asian rice pudding made by boiling rice, broken wheat, tapioca, or vermicelli with milk and sugar; it is flavoured with cardamom, raisins, saffron, cashew nuts, pistachios or almonds. It is typically served during a meal or as a dessert.

Samsung GT-I9100, f/2.7, 1/230 sec, ISO-40

Nahargarh Fort, Jaipur

Ice Block Maker

Nahargarh Fort Stepwell

Nahargarh Fort is one of three forts at Jaipur, Amber Fort and Jaigarh Fort, being the other two. Nahargarh means an “abode of tigers”. Nahargarh Fort was built in 1734 by Maharaja Sawai Jai Singh II, the founder of the city of Jaipur. The fort and stepwell at Nahargarh were built as a defense fort, which was never used. This stepwell design is unique one in that there’s no symmetry in kind of steps cut out of the hillside to collect water in.

Baoli Ghaus Ali Shah, Farrukhnagar

An old baoli or step-well was built by Ghaus Ali Shah, a local chief during the reign of Mughal emperor Farrukh Siyar. Built out of stone, lime plaster and bricks, this baoli wears some resemblance with the Turkish hammam. The water tank in the center is surrounded by a verandah with well-framed arches on all sides. There are also chambers for relaxation and recreation on the upper storeys.